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It’s the 26th of June. That means you have five days left to submit to LEFT.

I’m going to try my best to  respond to all submissions by August 1st.

So far I’ve accepted work from 18 wonderful people. I just accepted two amazing eight page poems, one by Chad Redden and one by Hera Lindsay Bird. I still have 50 submissions that I haven’t looked through yet.

At this point I feel like I don’t need any more submissions. I already have everything I need to create something spectacular. I want you to prove me wrong. Send me something that I need.

Here’s a comic by Joan Cornellà in case you need inspiration:

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My favourite thing about LEFT so far is that it has given me the opportunity to interact with heaps of great people. Email threads that started off as a simple submission or solicitation have turned into great conversations. LEFT has given me the chance to talk to old friends who I don’t keep in touch with as much as I would like to and also to make exciting new friends.

I really enjoyed doing the interviews with James Tadd Adcox and Lee Costello. They are both people who have a lot of love and respect for. I want to keep doing interviews for this tumblr.

I emailed Lydia Davis and she responded. She’s going to send me some translations to consider for LEFT.

Paul Cunningham and Michael O’Hara both sent me full length poetry manuscripts to read and they are both amazing. I can’t wait to buy them when they get published.

Sarah Jean Alexander said this about LEFT:

i’m going to be in this book which i predict will be the most beautiful book anyone’s ever held. i’m going to be in this book with kimmy & bob & dalton. jackson is a person i trust. submit! you can be in it too.’

I don’t know why she trusts me, I’ve never made a book before, but it made me feel very good to read it.

Since my last post I’ve accepted work by Theron Jacobs, Joshua Espinoza, Freya Daly Sadgrove, and Manuel Arturo Abreu, all of whom are incredible writers.

I’ve had a pretty bad cold for the past few days and haven’t been very productive. Caro and I have been watching Friends and sending out our manuscript.

I’m going to be in the USA for three weeks soon and I’m looking forward to hanging out with lots of people, some of whom are involved with LEFT.

The first five posts on this blog were assessed for a class I’m taking called Creative Enterprise. I got an A+. I don’t have to post on this blog for the class anymore, I’m just doing it because I love it.

This is the closest thing I have to a personal blog.

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I’m finally up to date with submissions! I’ve read work from almost 50 writers and I’ve accepted pieces from 10 of them.

So far LEFT is set include work from Kimmy Walters, Paul Cunningham, Samuel Carey, Penny Goring, Zarah Butcher-McGunnigle, Bob Schofield, Sarah Jean Alexander, Janey Smith, Michael O’Hara, & Dalton Day, as well as a few other people I’m working out the details with.

But I want more.

I’m going to send out  more solicitations and some reminders to people who already said they were going to submit. I also want work from everyone else. If you haven’t sent me anything yet, do it now. Please send me your beautiful things.

I’ve accepted a lot of poetry so far. I want more stories and visual art.

Also, I’m finally setting a deadline for submissions: the 1st of July.

Fill my inbox.
Drown me.
Show me what is possible.

8

In my post about the publications that I am drawing from for LEFT I mentioned Artifice Magazine. Artifice was founded by James Tadd Adcox and Rebekah Silverman. In addition to his work with Artifice, Tadd is also an extremely talented writer.

His first book, The Map of the System of Human Knowledge, is one of my favourites. I keep coming back to it for inspiration and enjoyment. His new book, Does Not Love, is coming out in October from Curbside Splendor and I can’t wait to read it. Tadd writes and publishes the type of work I want to have in LEFT. Interviewed him about his work with Artifice:

Read More

I guest edited/curated this month’s issue of ƒault.
ƒault is pretty much exactly what I want from an online journal, which is content and presentation that could only exist online.
I kept this in mind when coming up with the concept for my issue: Scroll.
I wanted writing that wouldn’t fit on a physical page.
We scroll everyday on the internet. I want to make readers consider that and writers consider how they could work with that and make that work for them.
I think I achieved this.
I didn’t receive many submissions (this makes sense, it was a hard brief to write for and the contributors had less than a month to get something together).
Out of the 16 submissions I received, I ended up publishing 9 pieces, only one of which was solicited.
The final lineup includes work by Bob Schofield, Jay Snodgrass, Shaun Gannon, DJ Berndt, Penny Goring, Daniel Golding, Max Trevor Thomas Edmond, Patrick Steadman, Evan Hatch, Shane Jesse Christmas, Dan Hogan, and Benjamin King.
Thank you to everyone who submitted.
There is a lot of raw energy in this issue and I hope it gets some people excited.
LEFT will be more refined and polished than Scroll but I think Scroll should give people a good idea of the type of energy and creativity I’m looking for with LEFT.
Another place where people can see an example of my publishing sensibility is UP, which I edit with Carolyn DeCarlo.
Huge thanks to Caden Lovelace, for letting me be a part of ƒault.

I guest edited/curated this month’s issue of ƒault.

ƒault is pretty much exactly what I want from an online journal, which is content and presentation that could only exist online.

I kept this in mind when coming up with the concept for my issue: Scroll.

I wanted writing that wouldn’t fit on a physical page.

We scroll everyday on the internet. I want to make readers consider that and writers consider how they could work with that and make that work for them.

I think I achieved this.

I didn’t receive many submissions (this makes sense, it was a hard brief to write for and the contributors had less than a month to get something together).

Out of the 16 submissions I received, I ended up publishing 9 pieces, only one of which was solicited.

The final lineup includes work by Bob Schofield, Jay Snodgrass, Shaun Gannon, DJ Berndt, Penny Goring, Daniel Golding, Max Trevor Thomas Edmond, Patrick Steadman, Evan Hatch, Shane Jesse Christmas, Dan Hogan, and Benjamin King.

Thank you to everyone who submitted.

There is a lot of raw energy in this issue and I hope it gets some people excited.

LEFT will be more refined and polished than Scroll but I think Scroll should give people a good idea of the type of energy and creativity I’m looking for with LEFT.

Another place where people can see an example of my publishing sensibility is UP, which I edit with Carolyn DeCarlo.

Huge thanks to Caden Lovelace, for letting me be a part of ƒault.

7

After I posted the announcement that Kimmy Walters was the first writer I’d accepted for LEFT, Carolyn suggested that I should also post about some of the writers I whose pieces I reject. At first I was resistant to this idea, but I’ve realised that if I want to be truly transparent about the process creating LEFT I will need to talk about both the positives and the negatives.

I won’t post about every writer whose work I reject. That would be cruel to those who submit their work and boring for the readers. What I’ll try to do is post about specific situations that I think could shed light on what I’m doing with LEFT.

Read More

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I thought it would be good to write about some publications that I’ve been drawing on for ideas and inspiration while working on LEFT. So this is me doing that.

Hue & Cry

Hue & Cry is my favourite New Zealand journal. Chloe Lane publishes consistently exciting work, but more important for the purposes of this post is the way that everything fits together. The individual works in each issue fit together like jigsaw pieces and the issues are bricks that form the most comfortable house. Everything feels so complete. The minimalist design by The International Office perfectly encompasses the Hue & Cry aesthetic.

Also, in a country dominated by a couple of big journals, Hue & Cry offers a space where less established and more unusual writers can reach a wide audience. This is definitely something I want to emulate with LEFT

Artifice

Artifice’s desire for work that is ‘aware of its own artifice’ is one that I share. I could easily steal that tagline and staple it onto LEFT and I think I would receive exactly the type of submissions I’m looking for.

With such loose submission guidelines one might expect Artifice to be messy, but nothing could be further from the truth. This magazine is not a home of meaningless experimentation. Their editors’ eyes are sharp. Each issue is a controlled explosion which uncovers the most shiniest crystals.

One of my favourite things about Artifice is their wishlist, a work of art in its own right.

The Newer York

The Newer York is not a controlled explosion. The Newer York is a firework factory on fire. Reading one of their books is a truly visual experience. I want LEFT to similar experience but with a more focused vision.

TNY pushes the idea that anything can be literature/everything is literature which I wholeheartedly believe in. But I think their focus on new forms causes them to miss out on some work that is doing interesting and new things but takes a more traditional form. I want to find a balance of these two things with LEFT.

Illuminati Girl Gang

'IGG is a zine dedicated to showcasing female perspectives in art and literature.' I don't see how anyone could hate on that mission statement. I salute Gabby for undertaking this project and for the quality work she publishes.

The thing about Illuminati Girl Gang that I will be drawing on the most is the way that it brings an internet aesthetic into the print medium. The majority of the art (in any form) that excites me is found online. One of my main goals for LEFT is to create that same sort of excitement around a physical artifact.

I’m also really impressed by the way Gabby has gotten so much coverage for the zine. This is something that I think will be a struggle for me to achieve with LEFT, especially since I don’t have such a strong mission statement.

While I admire and support all of these publications, I also view them as the competition. I will be measuring my success against theirs and trying to outdo them in terms of quality (which is subjective) and reach (which is more easily measured). These publications are important to me and I want LEFT to be important to people too.